Retrofits May Be Future of Wireless

STEALTH’s own Trey Nemeth recently published an article in Antennas Online, which focused on the growing trend among special events space owners to adapt to the DAS explosion.

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Many owners jumped on the DAS bandwagon a few years ago, and now find themselves needing to expand bandwidth. He notes that retrofits drive a great deal of the business, as early DAS adopters push their infrastructure to accommodate new or different technologies. Current concealment retrofits generally result from three scenarios:

  • More antennas or equipment are required. This starts with the operator determining a need for additional antennas to bolster coverage and capacity.  One example might be replacement of original DAS systems, like a recent stadium project. There, half of the venue’s vomitory openings were installed as DAS concealments two years ago. The owner now needs new boxes for the remaining openings.
  • Larger antennas or additional rotation is required.  Many of the first generation oDAS (outdoor DAS) installations involved relatively small (12 inches square) antennas being concealed in small systems.  In many cases, those are being replaced with larger, sometimes 2 or 2.5 times larger, concealments.In addition, to insure proper positioning of the antennas, significant azimuth and down-tilt rotation are required.  This creates a necessity to replace perfectly good concealments that were installed just a few years ago with new, larger concealments.
  • Cosmetic or vandalism concerns.  Let’s face it, when you get 80,000+ excited college football fans together, things can happen. Venue owners are seeking ways to conceal previously installed DAS antennas and amplifiers to prevent curious (and maybe rowdy) stadium patrons from damaging the costly equipment.  It is crucial that the most durable concealment materials are employed in areas that are accessible by the general public.

Retrofits aren’t a function of DAS, alone. Changes in telecommunications systems nationwde have driven concealment professionals to adopt new techniques and adapt to new technologies. With ingenuity, engineers have accommodated multiple carriers in single structures, swapped out housings in high-traffic areas, and more.

We look for more and more calls for adaptability in coming years.

Current concealment retrofits generally result from three scenarios:

  1. More antennas or equipment are required. This starts with the operator determining a need for additional antennas to bolster coverage and capacity.  One example might be replacement of original DAS systems, like a recent stadium project. There, half of the venue’s vomitory openings were installed as DAS concealments two years ago. The owner now needs new boxes for the remaining openings.
  2. Larger antennas or additional rotation is required.  Many of the first generation oDAS (outdoor DAS) installations involved relatively small (12 inches square) antennas being concealed in small systems.  In many cases, those are being replaced with larger, sometimes 2 or 2.5 times larger, concealments.In addition, to insure proper positioning of the antennas, significant azimuth and down-tilt rotation are required.  This creates a necessity to replace perfectly good concealments that were installed just a few years ago with new, larger concealments.
  3. Cosmetic or vandalism concerns.  Let’s face it, when you get 80,000+ excited college football fans together, things can happen. Venue owners are seeking ways to conceal previously installed DAS antennas and amplifiers to prevent curious (and maybe rowdy) stadium patrons from damaging the costly equipment.  It is crucial that the most durable concealment materials are employed in areas that are accessible by the general public.

– See more at: http://www.antennasonline.com/main/articles/insatiable-hunger-feeds-das/#sthash.s0g2pM6K.dpuf

Current concealment retrofits generally result from three scenarios:

  1. More antennas or equipment are required. This starts with the operator determining a need for additional antennas to bolster coverage and capacity.  One example might be replacement of original DAS systems, like a recent stadium project. There, half of the venue’s vomitory openings were installed as DAS concealments two years ago. The owner now needs new boxes for the remaining openings.
  2. Larger antennas or additional rotation is required.  Many of the first generation oDAS (outdoor DAS) installations involved relatively small (12 inches square) antennas being concealed in small systems.  In many cases, those are being replaced with larger, sometimes 2 or 2.5 times larger, concealments.In addition, to insure proper positioning of the antennas, significant azimuth and down-tilt rotation are required.  This creates a necessity to replace perfectly good concealments that were installed just a few years ago with new, larger concealments.
  3. Cosmetic or vandalism concerns.  Let’s face it, when you get 80,000+ excited college football fans together, things can happen. Venue owners are seeking ways to conceal previously installed DAS antennas and amplifiers to prevent curious (and maybe rowdy) stadium patrons from damaging the costly equipment.  It is crucial that the most durable concealment materials are employed in areas that are accessible by the general public.

– See more at: http://www.antennasonline.com/main/articles/insatiable-hunger-feeds-das/#sthash.s0g2pM6K.dpuf

 

Perfect Paramus ~ Rooftop Concealment!

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You just can’t get much more perfect than this! Rooftop concealments are our bread and butter. We specialize in custom fabrication and just thrive on a good rooftop challenge. This remarkable opportunity allowed our team to really shine with not only a great design for the city of Paramus, NJ, but also a highly custom artist finish. Take a look at the rooftop concealment panels that are installed in comparison to the existing building. Nice huh? Can’t wait to see this one all finished.

How-To-Inventory Your Project

Shipment kitThe old saying that a picture is worth a thousand words is true. And it can be worth thousands of dollars when it comes to tracking receipt of wireless concealment systems. This goes for all product types from rooftop concealments to even towers and poles.

Mike Reineck, our VP of field operations and installation, offers this lesson in how to inventory a concealment project when it arrives. In most cases, a blend of new technology and old school preparation can save time, and money.

“Larger projects with significant steel structure will often arrive on more than one truck,” says Mike. “Take a photo of the truck or trucks when they arrive. This is surprisingly effective if there is a problem, as we can compare it to the photos we took at the shop. We can determine if any trouble arose during shipping.”’

Reineck also suggests:

  • Make sure you are at the site with a set of drawings when the shipments arrive. Look for identifying marks as you pull parts off the truck. Compare those to the drawings, and then keep the parts in order on the ground…just like the shop teacher taught us in “small engines” class.
  • Check off each individual part on the materials sheet as you unload it, and you’ll have a full accounting of the shipment when you’re done.
  • If you’re missing “part 21” – you can call STEALTH, and we’ll help you find it (sometimes we pack parts within parts) or ship it ASAP.

Once you’ve inventoried all the parts, pull out the digital camera again and snap some pix of the pile. “That way, if some part gets removed at some point, you can pretty easily identify which one…which cuts down on replacement time,” says Reineck.

Another use of the digital camera: take a photo of the materials sheet that shipped with the goods, once you’ve “checked off” each item. This is a helpful inventory for site workers as they begin to assemble the project. It’s also an insurance policy for the site owner, should the construction contractor claim items didn’t arrive.

Photos will also come in handy if the receiver notes any damage to the plastic wrapped crates. Photograph the crate; open it, assess if there are any internal damages and, if so. Photograph those, too. All that documentation can come in handy.

“The sooner anybody on the site, or back at STEALTH, can identify a problem, the sooner we can fix it. So we encourage a call the minute anything is discovered!” says Reineck. And that can save time – which always equals money at a job site.