Small Cell Networks are a “Smart Wireless Strategy”

The Austin Skyline in Austin, Texas, shines on a late afternoon. The iconic Austin highrises are reflected in Lady Bird Lake.Small cells are an easier solution to implement in cities and neighborhood struggling with their wireless connectivity. Austin, Texas is trying to improve their network without distracting from Austin’s legendary weirdness. Small Cell Networks and DAS are easier to implement, and the best part is that they’re almost totally camouflaged when concealed.

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Forecasts Show Immense Growth for DAS in the U.S.

LVMS Media Ctr. StealthAccording to a new iGR study, the U.S. DAS market is about to see some extraordinary growth.

“After continued analysis of the DAS market, we have forecasted the number of U.S. DAS installations in commercial buildings and multiple dwelling units, as well as the associated build and operating costs,” said Iain Gillott, president and founder of iGR. “iGR expects that from 2014 to 2019 spending for both the build and operating costs of DAS will total $29.5 billion.”

This study splits the market for DAS based on the size of the buildings they’re housed in. it also discusses the advantages and challenges of distributed antenna systems and includes the profiles of various vendors.

Want to read the study in its entirety? Click here.

Key Factor in NYC Apartment Hunts: Wireless Signal

NYCWe all know how frustrating it is to drop a call, especially in emergency situations. Can you imagine what that would be like if it happened in your own home? Talk about awful. This is a predicament that many people in NYC would face if it weren’t for in-house wireless networks that developers continue to add to high rises that are at or above the level of cell tower antennas.

Michael Graves, an associate broker at Douglas Elliman has noticed that more and more of his clients are commenting on the number of bars on their phones. “A strong cell reception is a prerequisite,” he says. Without these DAS (distributed antenna systems) installations, some residents would strongly consider moving. “If you’re living in Manhattan,” he said, “you shouldn’t be getting the cell reception that you would in the woods, especially when you’re buying a multimillion-dollar apartment.”  These are exactly the scenarios that developers want to avoid.

Read the full New York Times article here.

Retrofits May Be Future of Wireless

STEALTH’s own Trey Nemeth recently published an article in Antennas Online, which focused on the growing trend among special events space owners to adapt to the DAS explosion.

Trey-96x96

Many owners jumped on the DAS bandwagon a few years ago, and now find themselves needing to expand bandwidth. He notes that retrofits drive a great deal of the business, as early DAS adopters push their infrastructure to accommodate new or different technologies. Current concealment retrofits generally result from three scenarios:

  • More antennas or equipment are required. This starts with the operator determining a need for additional antennas to bolster coverage and capacity.  One example might be replacement of original DAS systems, like a recent stadium project. There, half of the venue’s vomitory openings were installed as DAS concealments two years ago. The owner now needs new boxes for the remaining openings.
  • Larger antennas or additional rotation is required.  Many of the first generation oDAS (outdoor DAS) installations involved relatively small (12 inches square) antennas being concealed in small systems.  In many cases, those are being replaced with larger, sometimes 2 or 2.5 times larger, concealments.In addition, to insure proper positioning of the antennas, significant azimuth and down-tilt rotation are required.  This creates a necessity to replace perfectly good concealments that were installed just a few years ago with new, larger concealments.
  • Cosmetic or vandalism concerns.  Let’s face it, when you get 80,000+ excited college football fans together, things can happen. Venue owners are seeking ways to conceal previously installed DAS antennas and amplifiers to prevent curious (and maybe rowdy) stadium patrons from damaging the costly equipment.  It is crucial that the most durable concealment materials are employed in areas that are accessible by the general public.

Retrofits aren’t a function of DAS, alone. Changes in telecommunications systems nationwde have driven concealment professionals to adopt new techniques and adapt to new technologies. With ingenuity, engineers have accommodated multiple carriers in single structures, swapped out housings in high-traffic areas, and more.

We look for more and more calls for adaptability in coming years.

Current concealment retrofits generally result from three scenarios:

  1. More antennas or equipment are required. This starts with the operator determining a need for additional antennas to bolster coverage and capacity.  One example might be replacement of original DAS systems, like a recent stadium project. There, half of the venue’s vomitory openings were installed as DAS concealments two years ago. The owner now needs new boxes for the remaining openings.
  2. Larger antennas or additional rotation is required.  Many of the first generation oDAS (outdoor DAS) installations involved relatively small (12 inches square) antennas being concealed in small systems.  In many cases, those are being replaced with larger, sometimes 2 or 2.5 times larger, concealments.In addition, to insure proper positioning of the antennas, significant azimuth and down-tilt rotation are required.  This creates a necessity to replace perfectly good concealments that were installed just a few years ago with new, larger concealments.
  3. Cosmetic or vandalism concerns.  Let’s face it, when you get 80,000+ excited college football fans together, things can happen. Venue owners are seeking ways to conceal previously installed DAS antennas and amplifiers to prevent curious (and maybe rowdy) stadium patrons from damaging the costly equipment.  It is crucial that the most durable concealment materials are employed in areas that are accessible by the general public.

– See more at: http://www.antennasonline.com/main/articles/insatiable-hunger-feeds-das/#sthash.s0g2pM6K.dpuf

Current concealment retrofits generally result from three scenarios:

  1. More antennas or equipment are required. This starts with the operator determining a need for additional antennas to bolster coverage and capacity.  One example might be replacement of original DAS systems, like a recent stadium project. There, half of the venue’s vomitory openings were installed as DAS concealments two years ago. The owner now needs new boxes for the remaining openings.
  2. Larger antennas or additional rotation is required.  Many of the first generation oDAS (outdoor DAS) installations involved relatively small (12 inches square) antennas being concealed in small systems.  In many cases, those are being replaced with larger, sometimes 2 or 2.5 times larger, concealments.In addition, to insure proper positioning of the antennas, significant azimuth and down-tilt rotation are required.  This creates a necessity to replace perfectly good concealments that were installed just a few years ago with new, larger concealments.
  3. Cosmetic or vandalism concerns.  Let’s face it, when you get 80,000+ excited college football fans together, things can happen. Venue owners are seeking ways to conceal previously installed DAS antennas and amplifiers to prevent curious (and maybe rowdy) stadium patrons from damaging the costly equipment.  It is crucial that the most durable concealment materials are employed in areas that are accessible by the general public.

– See more at: http://www.antennasonline.com/main/articles/insatiable-hunger-feeds-das/#sthash.s0g2pM6K.dpuf

 

World Cup Fever Has Media, Wireless Devices Abuzz

indexWorld Cup Fever has soccer fans preparing for a month-long marathon of victory and heartbreak.

Numerous tech companies are similarly prepping – hoping their installations deliver joy, vs. pain.

So we thought we’d take a few minutes to look at some of the technology considerations driving this feast of “football.” (And no, they aren’t really DAS related…but we stand ready to help!)

First up, the stadium on the Amazon, in Manaus, Brazil. Construction required steel to be ferried up 4,500 kilometers of river way to this steamy, sprawling city.

As one of its architects noted – between managing the three cell phones strapped to his belt – you can’t build a technological stadium without money, and this one cost $319 million. Visit it virtually here.

No word on the cell phone systems in this and the other 11 new or refurbished stadia, but this Boston Globe report gives us some indication that DAS should be part of Brazil’s 2.0 strategy.

The upshot: Facebook, Twitter and countless apps are preparing for a worldwide cacophony of World Cup messages. But down in Brazil, wireless infrastructure lags.

Cleveland Rocks!

Not only is Cleveland home to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but it is also home to new DAS networks.

Cleveland Indian fans will now have better connectivity inside Progressive Field. The Cleveland Indians have partnered with Verizon to install DAS and Wi-Fi inside the stadium.

Neil Weiss, the Indians’ Senior Vice President of Technology and Chief Information Officer, states in an article by Inside Towers, ” ‘This implementation will significantly enhance fans’ digital experience at the ballpark by making social media and their favorite apps more easily accessible, as well as completing common functions like making a call or sending an email or text.’ ”

According to the article, the DAS network will be an in-building network with individual antennas. The DAS will allow fans to use Verizon’s high-speed 4G LTE network. The Wi-Fi network will provide additional internet coverage throughout the stadium.

STEALTH has completed DAS concealments at a number of well-known professional stadiums including Dodger Stadium, O.co Coliseum, and even Petco Park. STEALTH is here to Cover Your DAS™. You can find out more about STEALTH’s DAS concealments by visiting www.coveryourdas.com.

Everything Gets Better With Age!

Like a good steak or a good bottle of wine, many things are better when aged. This DAS concealment is no exception.

Last summer we started grilling up this DAS concealment. Our concealment was finally prepared and served up to our customers.  If you don’t recall, this DAS concealment is located in a prominent hotel in downtown Atlanta, GA. We prepared side mounted boxes to hide the iDAS throughout the hotel. We hit a few delays a long the way, but each delay only made our project better.

Check out the completed site below!

DAS Concealment

Super DAS Bowl

Thanks to new DAS upgrades, fans at this year’s Super Bowl can text, Tweet, and Instagram pictures from what is sure to be an icy cold game.

This year’s Super Bowl has been surrounded by hysteria concerning the weather conditions. With the game being played at MetLife Stadium, an open-air stadium in the New York/New Jersey area, conditions are expected to be rough. Despite the uncontrollable weather conditions, the NFL is able to control the technology available to fans attending the game.

Michelle McKenna-Doyle, Chief Information Officer for the NFL, told New York News 1, ” ‘A lot has been done over the last year,…We’ve upgraded both the DAS, distributed antenna system, a whole new LTE infrastructure, as well as a brand new Wi-Fi, taking advantage of the new high-density applications that are out on the market now.’ “

The DAS upgrades at MetLife do have some pros and cons. The DAS upgrades allow for fans to text, Instagram, and browse Facebook from the stadium. The downside is fans will not be able to live stream the game through the NFL Mobile app or the Fox Sports app, as it would take up too much bandwidth. It seems though for most fans, the pros of the DAS upgrade outweigh the cons.

 

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